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Wednesday, October 21, 2020 | History

6 edition of Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants found in the catalog.

Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants

Evolutionary Aspects

by Jonathan Shaw

  • 94 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by CRC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Botany & plant sciences,
  • Science,
  • Plant Biochemistry,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life Sciences - Botany,
  • Science / Botany,
  • Effect of heavy metals on,
  • Evolution,
  • Heavy-metal tolerant plants,
  • Plants,
  • Plants, Effect of heavy metals

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages270
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8260947M
    ISBN 100849368529
    ISBN 109780849368523

    Papers on the ecology of metal contaminated habitats and macroevolutionary, physiological, molecular and microevolutionary aspects are included in this book. Metal tolerance in fungi, algae, lichens, bryophytes and angiosperms is considered. Chapters on metallothioneins and the evolution of tolerance in animals are included for comparison. This comprehensive collection of papers should be of. 4 Bierzychudek, P. () Ecology68, 7 Bell, G., Lefevre, L., Giraldeau, L-A. and Evolution in Higher Plants, Edward Weary, D. () Oecolo Arnold Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants: A Model Evolutionary System Mark R. Macnair Evolved tolerance to toxic concentrations of heavy metals in plants inhabiting spoil.

    Discusses the mechanisms underlying heavy metal signaling and role of MAPKs in the heavy metal stress tolerance Concludes with impending procedures to chelator enhanced phytoremediation technology This book summarizes the development of highly tolerant cultivars via plant breeding, genomics, and proteomic approaches. For example, Shaw and Gupta and Sandallo focus on heavy metal tolerance (or toxicity) in plants, a group that has been heavily researched, partly because of the applied uses of heavy metal tolerant plants in restoration and phytoextraction/phytomining operations. Anderson, Bruce, Ann de Peyster, Shayne C. Gad, et al., eds.

      Heavy metals are naturally occurring in the earth‘s crust but anthropogenic and industrial activities have led to drastic environmental pollutions in distinct areas. Plants are able to colonize such sites due to several mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance. Understanding of these pathways enables different fruitful approaches like phytoremediation and by:   Techniques available for assessing the tolerance of plants to heavy metal toxins are reviewed. All are based on physiological responses and range from long-term growth trials in metal-contaminated substrates, to rapid cytological by:


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Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants by Jonathan Shaw Download PDF EPUB FB2

It covers the evolution of heavy metal tolerance in groups of plants, fungi, and protists. The book discusses the physiological, genetic and molecular aspects of metal tolerances. It deals with the evolution of populations in metal-contaminated environments. Several chapters include tolerance in animals in order to place the rest of the book on plants in proper by: This volume provides a synthesis of recent work on evolutionary aspects of metal tolerance in plants.

It presents contributions Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants book scientists with a wide diversity of expertise. It covers the evolution of heavy metal tolerance in groups of plants, fungi, and protists.

The book discusses the physio. It covers the evolution of heavy metal tolerance in groups of plants, fungi, and protists. The book discusses the physiological, genetic and molecular aspects of metal tolerances.

It deals with the evolution of populations in metal-contaminated environments. Several chapters include tolerance in animals in order to place the rest of the book on plants in proper Range: $ - $ Screening of Indigenous Vegetation for use in Phytoremediation: Distribution, Abundance and Taxonomy of Heavy Metal Tolerant Plant Species in a Degraded Mine Site.

by Isaac Mawusi Adanyeguh, Sister-Doreen Doamekpor, et al. The Heavy Metal Tolerant Flora of Southcentral Africa. Only 1 left in stock - order soon. This book could provide simple anthology for undergraduate and postgraduate students to understand fundamentals of heavy metal pollution in the environment.

The book closes with a prelude to an inclusive study of biodiversity that could provide new biofilters for metal detoxification. The book closes with a prelude to an inclusive study of biodiversity that could provide new biofilters for metal detoxification.

Keywords Biodiversity Prospecting Genetic Engineering Heavy Metal Perception Metal Sequestration MAPK Signalling Metal Tolerance. Heavy metal phytotoxicity has been known for more than a century.

However, research in the past years has confirmed the immense damage by metal pollution to plants, the soil and ultimately to humans. Publisher Summary. This chapter illustrates the literature on those plants and micro-organisms which can combat excessive quantities of heavy metal ions. Heavy metals include those metals which have density greater than five.

Their common feature in regard to biological life is that in excessive quantities they are poisonous and can cause death Cited by: The main class of metal chelator known in plants is phytochelatins (PCs) and metallothioneins (MTs) which are generally cysteine-rich peptides, besides, normal expression of GSH/PCs during metal exposure, certain genetic manipulations of these substances help plants to improve toxicity of heavy metals.

Amino acids and amines. Amino acids and their derivatives have been reported to chelate metal ions, thus conferring metal tolerance to plants. Amino acids, particularly proline and histidine, have been found to chelate metal ions in cells as well as in the xylem sap (Rai, ; Sharma and Dietz, ).Cited by: Plant Metal Interaction: Emerging Remediation Techniques.

covers different heavy metals and their effect on soils and plants, along with the remediation techniques currently available. As cultivable land is declining day-by-day as a result of increased metals in our soil and water, there is an urgent need to remediate these effects.

This book provides a timely update on the recent progress in our knowledge of all aspects of plant's perception, signalling and adaptation to a variety of environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, heat, cold, frost and soil pH extremes, Al and heavy metal toxicities, desiccation, waterlogging, UV, oxidative stress and pathogens.

Mycorrhizal plants are also more tolerant to toxic heavy metals than the non-mycorrhizal plants (Gonzalez-Chavez et al., ;Hildebrandt et al., ; Jan and Parray,Hashem et al., Plants have diverse mechanisms for metal detoxification, enabling them to tolerate heavy metal stress.

The defense systems against heavy metal stress include mycorrhizae, cellular exudates, plasma membrane, heat shock proteins, phytochelatins (PCs), metallothioneins (MTs), organic acids, and amino acids.

Vacuolar sequestration of heavy metals in plant cell. Following the uptake through transporters such as ZIP (zinc/iron-regulated transporters) family members, heavy metal ions like Cd2+ enters the cytosol and it stimulates the glutathione-derived synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) by PC synthases (PCS).Cited by: Offers a synthesis of work on evolutionary aspects of metal tolerance in plants.

This book covers the evolution of heavy metal tolerance in groups of plants, fungi, and protists. It discusses the physiological, genetic and molecular aspects of metal tolerances.

It deals with the evolution of populations in metal-contaminated environments. This paper highlights major developments in the field of heavy metal tolerance in plants over the last 15 years.

Advances in experimental and theoretical aspects are considered. The value of both intra‐ and interspecific studies in assessing the ecological significance of adaptive strategies is stressed.

Metal toxicity is an important factor limiting the growth of plants in many environments. Some metals, such as copper and zinc, are micronutrients at low concentrations and become toxic at higher levels, whereas others (e.g.

aluminium and lead) are. Heavy-Metal Tolerance: Some plant species absorb heavy-metals and accumulate them in their cell vacuoles without much damage to a level that would be lethal to sensitive or non-tolerant species.

Such plants are called as accumulators or super-accumulators or heavy-metal tolerant plants. Read "Approaches to Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants" by Sumira Jan available from Rakuten Kobo.

This book summarizes the development of highly tolerant cultivars via plant breeding, genomics, and proteomic approaches Brand: Springer Singapore.

Singh et al. Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants. study sensing and signal transduction changes that take place after plants’ exposure to stress. For instance, Tamás et al.

() reported that early signs of metal toxicity in barley were similar to water deficiency signs, and thus, overexpression of genesFile Size: 2MB.Heavy metal detoxification and tolerance mechanisms in plants: Implications for phytoremediation.

Anamika Kushwaha, Radha Rani, Sanjay Kumar, Aishvarya Gautam. Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Teliyar Ganj, by: Metal accumulating plant species can concentrate heavy metals like Cd, Zn, Co, Mn, Ni, and Pb up to or times those taken up by nonaccumulator (excluder) plants.

In most cases, microorganisms bacteria and fungi, living in the rhizosphere closely associated with plants, may contribute to mobilize metal ions, increasing the bioavailable Cited by: